Bad Manners On Tour 2011

The History of Bad Manners

A super-group of global proportions is born…

BusterBy 1979, the Bad Manners spectacle was created and there was a firm following for the band in North and East London's venues. Fronted by the enormous and outrageous BUSTER BLOODVESSEL this nine-piece musical mini-orchestra took the scene by storm with a diet of luscious and endearing lunacy that is still kicking today, except today they are recognised and welcomed across continents, oceans and especially Finland. Their early forays into the pubs and clubs created a cult live following that enabled them to be signed by Magnet Records for an 'undisclosed' sum of money without even recording a demo tape. They had succeeded in creating a unique blend of SKA, jump blues and boogie known as Ska'N'B which became the name of their first album in 1980.

Between 1980 and 1983, they spent 111 weeks in the pop charts and had 15 hit singles. Their time in the charts exceeded that of Little Richard, Fats Domino, The Moody Blues, Culture Club and Frankie Goes to Hollywood.

Hits included Ne-Ne-Na-Na-Na-Na-Nu-Nu, Lip Up Fatty, Special Brew, Lorraine, Just a Feeling, Can-Can and Walking in the Sunshine to name but a few. Each was accompanied by outrageous appearances on Top of the Pops that endeared Buster and his chums to the great British public.

The band were always far more than a simple charting prospect however as WACO  "We Aint' Comin' Out"anyone who has seen them live will know. They are an unbelievable live act with a cult status that transcends anything the less charitable critic might dare to write. A world of trick and treat, pinhead and skinhead, circus and freakshow all combined with honest vulgarity.1000% enthusiasm is matched by 1000% proficiency every time! By the time the band gets into its live strides, the audience will be covered in water and other fluids, various inflatables and body sweat. Yes sirree, the band know how to manner their fans badly…

Bad Manners and the politics of 'race.' Ridiculous charges rejected…

Spain Tour PosterThe early 1980's were strange times in Britain. On one hand, the Thatcherite experience benefited millions of entrepreneurs, first time home owners and people who had the opportunity or backing to take up the challenge. On the other hand, old industries were dying or changing in order to survive and millions were thrown out of work to face what appeared to be a very bleak future. There was also a noted increase in racist activity. Bad Manners were a solitary fun voice in 1980's Britain. Even Madness acknowledged the lead Bad Manners had in 1980. Buster actually declared 1980 as the Year of the Fatty in terms of the Chinese Calendar (he had been banned from several Eat All You Can venues in London at this time). One of the strangest things that came about at this point however was the accusation from some senior political circles that Bad Manners and other SKA bands were becoming 'magnets' for Neo-Nazi groups. The charge was simplistic and also ridiculous. Firstly, the white working class skinhead cult was actually connected with the black working class fashion cults of the Afro-Caribbean in terms of its desire to 'express' an identity for people. Secondly, the white skins were dancing to and were addicted to West Indian-inspired SKA music. Finally, the SKA bands were completely multi-cultural and multi-coloured. In Bad Manners case, the line-up included Scots, Irish, Jews and a black man, as well as English whites. That this or any 2-Tone SKA band could have been accused of being a friend to the extremists or racists is laughable. Perhaps 1% of skins and SKA fans may have been dodgy but in any case, they were left in no doubt as to the opinions of the band and the audience. Bad Manners were a physical band but they were anti-violence. If fighting started, they refused to play. It was as simple as that…
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